WWW Wednesday 01/23/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

current

The Silent Patient
by Alex Michaelides
This Thriller was my Book of the Month pick for January. There’s been so much buzz around this one, and I’m super intrigued so far!

Women Talking
by Miriam Toews
This is a NetGalley ARC (pub. date April 2, 2019) about a group of Mennonite women struggling to decide what to do in the aftermath of sexual violence in their community.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz
by Heather Morris

I’m definitely in the minority opinion on this book, but it’s really not working for me. The story itself is fine (although, being based on a true story, that really no credit to the author) but the writing style feels really mechanical and detached to me. Apparently the story was originally written as a screenplay, and I feel like knowing that has made some of my stylistic issues with it make more sense.

I recently finished reading…

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Queenie, by Candice Carty-Williams
This was a NetGalley ARC (pub. date March 19, 2019) about a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman named (you guessed it) Queenie. Queenie is in the midst of a downward spiral for most of this novel, coping with a miscarriage and loss of a long term relationship through lots of casual sex with people who couldn’t care less about her emotional well-being or even her sexual pleasure. Needless to say, this isn’t an effective coping mechanism for her. Full review won’t be up until the publication date, but I rated this one four stars.

Severance, by Ling Ma
Severance is a post-apocalyptic novel about Candace Chen, a Millennial living in New York who immigrated to the US from China as a child. This book has a really interesting mix of things going on, from the science fiction aspects (a mysterious fungal infection which has rendered most of the population zombie-like) to the exploration of culture and the experience of immigrants. A full review will be up tomorrow!

Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver
I adore Barbara Kingsolver, and as much as I personally loved this novel, I do understand why it has very mixed reviews. This book is a mixture of contemporary and historical fiction, following the stories of two families living in the same place over a century apart. Kingsolver explores themes surrounding societal upheaval and family drama. At times, it can be a bit dialog-heavy and long-winded, and I think that was the bulk of the reason for some negative reviews. Personally, I was really invested in the characters, and these issues didn’t get to me. Full review here.

Up next…

Wildcard
by Marie Lu

I wasn’t super crazy about the first book of this series, but I was intrigued enough by the ending to want to continue. Both books have pretty solid averages on GoodReads, so I’m trying to be optimistic about starting this one.

Here’s the synopsis:

Emika Chen barely made it out of the Warcross Championships alive. Now that she knows the truth behind Hideo’s new NeuroLink algorithm, she can no longer trust the one person she’s always looked up to, who she once thought was on her side.

Determined to put a stop to Hideo’s grim plans, Emika and the Phoenix Riders band together, only to find a new threat lurking on the neon-lit streets of Tokyo. Someone’s put a bounty on Emika’s head, and her sole chance for survival lies with Zero and the Blackcoats, his ruthless crew. But Emika soon learns that Zero isn’t all that he seems–and his protection comes at a price.

Caught in a web of betrayal, with the future of free will at risk, just how far will Emika go to take down the man she loves?

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 01/16/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

captureSeverance
by Ling Ma
“An offbeat office novel turns apocalyptic satire as a young woman transforms from orphan to worker bee to survivor.” I’m clearly a bit early into this book to have formed any opinion yet.

Queenie
by Candice Carty-Williams
This is a NetGalley ARC with a publication date of March 19th. Queenie follows the story of a young Jamaican British woman as her life goes into a downward spiral.

Unsheltered
by Barbara Kingsolver
This one has super mixed reviews, but I”m enjoying it so far, despite the somewhat slow pace. Unsheltered is half contemporary, half historical fiction and follows the stories of two families living in the same house over 100 years apart.

I recently finished reading…

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An Anonymous Girl
by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkanen
Review to come soon! I was hesitant to read this after The Wife Between Us fell really flat for me, but I’m glad I gave it a chance. It’s totally a Lifetime movie in the making and 100% ridiculous, but a super fun thriller. It was also kind of an interesting contrast to The Stranger Inside, which I also read recently. Part of the reason The Stranger Inside didn’t work for me was my intense dislike of the protagonist. The protagonist of An Anonymous Girl shares a lot of similarities with that character as far as what makes her a hot mess, but she was infinitely more likable. Hendricks and Pekkanen did a really excellent job of writing a flawed protagonist without making the readers hate her.

American Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of Teenagers
by Nancy Jo Sales
This was absolutely not for me. You can read my full review here, but basically, the whole book reads like a lot of hysterical hang-wringing over teenage sexuality while seeming completely divorced from the reality of the situation.

Antigone
by Sophocles
I won’t be reviewing this for a few reasons: I despise reviewing classics because it always feels a bit presumptuous, I find it unfair to rate a play based on reading it rather than viewing it as intended, and also because I mainly picked this up as a refresher while brainstorming my review of Home Firewhich I still need to write. Home Fire is a modern retelling of Antigone, which I hadn’t read since sophomore year of high school, so I thought I should delve into the inspiration of the novel again in order to better understand it. I will try to get my Home Fire review up as soon as possible!

Up next…

Women Talking
by Miriam Toews

(ARC provided by NetGalley; publication date 04/02/2019)

One evening, eight Mennonite women climb into a hay loft to conduct a secret meeting. For the past two years, each of these women, and more than a hundred other girls in their colony, has been repeatedly violated in the night by demons coming to punish them for their sins. Now that the women have learned they were in fact drugged and attacked by a group of men from their own community, they are determined to protect themselves and their daughters from future harm.

While the men of the colony are off in the city, attempting to raise enough money to bail out the rapists and bring them home, these women—all illiterate, without any knowledge of the world outside their community and unable even to speak the language of the country they live in—have very little time to make a choice: Should they stay in the only world they’ve ever known or should they dare to escape?

Based on real events and told through the “minutes” of the women’s all-female symposium, Toews’s masterful novel uses wry, politically engaged humor to relate this tale of women claiming their own power to decide.

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 01/09/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

captureAmerican Girls: Social Media and the Secret Lives of American Teenagers
by Nancy Jo Sales

I picked this one up because of the feminist themes, but I feel like I’m too young for this book. So much of it is telling me things I don’t need to be told. Thanks, Nancy Jo, but I already know what “on fleek” means. It also comes across as hyper-critical of the sex positive movement, and while I think there are very valid criticisms to make of it, I’m not sure that all of the ones in this book fall into that category. Maybe I’ll find something valuable as I get further into this, but thus far I’m not a fan.

Queenie
by Candice Carty-Williams

Obviously I’m not really far enough into this one to have formed an opinion yet, but the publisher describes it like this: “Bridget Jones’s Diary meets Americanah in this disarmingly honest, boldly political, and truly inclusive novel that will speak to anyone who has gone looking for love and found something very different in its place.”

I recently finished reading…

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The Stranger Inside, by Laura Benedict
This was an ARC of a February 5th release. It’s a mystery/thriller novel in which a woman comes home from a trip to find that a stranger has moved into her house. Things get… even more ridiculous from there. I wasn’t a fan of this one. Full review to come.

Home Fire, by Kamila Shamsie
I had no idea when I started this that it was a modern retelling of Antigone. It has kind of mixed reviews, but I really liked it. The myth is retold with modern Muslim characters dealing with extremism and loss within their family. Full review to come.

The Immortalists, by Chloe Benjamin
In case you missed it, you can find my review here. This was a four star review for me, but the magical themes were much a bit more understated than I’d expected from the blurb.

The Au Pair, by Emma Rous
I had a weird experience with this one, because I feel like it did a lot of things that I tend to dislike in thrillers, mainly stretching the suspense of disbelief way too far and having a copious amount of affairs…. but I kind of liked it? It’s definitely a guilty pleasure kind of read, and it feels like it should be adapted into a Lifetime movie. Full review to come!

Elevation, by Stephen King
Garbage. Sorry, but Stephen King can do so much better than this. You can read my review here.

Up next…

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Severance
by Ling Ma

An offbeat office novel turns apocalyptic satire as a young woman transforms from orphan to worker bee to survivor

Candace Chen, a millennial drone self-sequestered in a Manhattan office tower, is devoted to routine. With the recent passing of her Chinese immigrant parents, she’s had her fill of uncertainty. She’s content just to carry on: She goes to work, troubleshoots the teen-targeted Gemstone Bible, watches movies in a Greenpoint basement with her boyfriend.

So Candace barely notices when a plague of biblical proportions sweeps New York. Then Shen Fever spreads. Families flee. Companies halt operations. The subways squeak to a halt. Her bosses enlist her as part of a dwindling skeleton crew with a big end-date payoff. Soon entirely alone, still unfevered, she photographs the eerie, abandoned city as the anonymous blogger NY Ghost.

Candace won’t be able to make it on her own forever, though. Enter a group of survivors, led by the power-hungry IT tech Bob. They’re traveling to a place called the Facility, where, Bob promises, they will have everything they need to start society anew. But Candace is carrying a secret she knows Bob will exploit. Should she escape from her rescuers?

A send-up and takedown of the rituals, routines, and missed opportunities of contemporary life, Ling Ma’s Severance is a moving family story, a quirky coming-of-adulthood tale, and a hilarious, deadpan satire. Most important, it’s a heartfelt tribute to the connections that drive us to do more than survive.Capture2.PNG

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

WWW Wednesday 01/02/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

CaptureElevation
by Stephen King
This is Stephen King’s latest short story. I picked it up without knowing anything about the story, mainly because it’s been ages since I read any King. However, looking at the average rating on Goodreads (currently 3.76) I’m not sure how much I’m going to like it. It’s still early, and if it’s awful, at least it’s short. I should finish this one up very soon.

The Immortalists
by Chloe Benjamin
This story starts with a group of young siblings who visit a psychic rumored to be able to tell anyone their exact date of death. The information she provides to them inform their choices for the rest of their lives. I have a physical copy of this, but I was listening to the audio book and my loan ran out. Now I have to page through the book to figure out where I left off. Pray for me. Lol.

The Stranger Inside
by Laura Benedict
This is a NetGalley ARC and I’m honestly really not feeling it. I keep managing to find thrillers with super unlikable protagonists, and this is such a deal-breaker for me. All of the tension in a thriller should be (in my opinion) tied up in empathizing with the protagonist so that you actually care about what happens to them. Kimber is truly awful, selfish, and habitually dishonest. She makes a point of sleeping with married men because she’s a horrible, broken person, and their emotional distance feels “safer” to her. Then she befriends the wife of one of these married men that she’s slept with, because she thinks it will be fun to unnerve him with her proximity to his wife. Fast forward two years, and she’s become legitimately emotionally invested in this friendship. What could go wrong? None of this is even the main thrust of the novel, by the way, I just really needed to rant about it. I’m almost done with this book and I can’t wait for it to be over.

I recently finished reading…

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The Haunting of Hill House
by Shirley Jackson
I’ve been dying to read this since the Netflix adaptation came out, and I finally had time for it, only to realize that the Netflix adaptation is… not really an adaptation? Like, at all. The stories bear very little similarity to one another besides the name of the house and the names of some of the characters. I may skip doing a full review of this one in favor of doing a comparison with the adaptation. I do think the book is worth reading, but it definitely feels dated. If you’re very partial to contemporary novels, this might not be a good fit for you, but I really enjoyed the subtle horror of it all. Bizarrely, it reminded me a bit of The Bell Jar, which probably sounds like a ridiculous comparison, but I felt like the protagonists were in a really similar place psychologically.

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger
by Rebecca Traister
I just finished this one today, but prior to getting to a full review, I want to say that I can’t recommend it strongly enough. I had previously read and reviewed Rage Becomes Her, by Soraya Chemaly. and I was a bit worried that the similarity in subject matter would make this one feel dull and repetitive. I actually found that the two books covered surprisingly little of the same ground despite centering on the same basic subject matter. Rage Becomes Her felt more psychological while Good and Mad veered more towards the political. Both books are important and well done, and both get loads of points for their attention to intersectionality.

Mirage
by Somaiya Daud
(Full review here.) This is a YA fantasy novel about a girl who is kidnapped by royalty to serve as a body double for the princess of the ruling class. Mirage plays with a lot of really interesting themes in regards to colonialism, culture, privilege, and power. All in all, I think I liked the idea of this novel more than the actual execution, but I’m still feeling really optimistic about the next book in the series.

Up next…

The Au Pair 
by Emma Rous

(This is a duplicate from last week’s post… and the week before, because I’ve been super lazy about reading during the holidays and have yet to start this.)

A grand estate, terrible secrets, and a young woman who bears witness to it all. If V. C. Andrews and Kate Morton had a literary love child, Emma Rous’ The Au Pair would be it.

Seraphine Mayes and her twin brother Danny were born in the middle of summer at their family’s estate on the Norfolk coast. Within hours of their birth, their mother threw herself from the cliffs, the au pair fled, and the village thrilled with whispers of dark cloaks, changelings, and the aloof couple who drew a young nanny into their inner circle.

Now an adult, Seraphine mourns the recent death of her father. While going through his belongings, she uncovers a family photograph that raises dangerous questions. It was taken on the day the twins were born, and in the photo, their mother, surrounded by her husband and her young son, is beautifully dressed, smiling serenely, and holding just one baby.

Who is the child and what really happened that day?

One person knows the truth, if only Seraphine can find her.

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

WWW Wednesday 12/26/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

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Mirage
by Somaiya Daud
Mirage is a young adult fantasy novel and the debut of Somaiay Daud. This one is a bit of a weird reading experience for me in that I’m more than halfway through and still have no idea how I feel about this book. The protagonist, Amani is kidnapped due to her likeness to the princess of the oppressive and much maligned ruling class, to be used as a body double in potentially dangerous situations. At no point in this book have I been tempted to quit reading, but I also haven’t felt like the plot has really grabbed me, either, so I’m feeling really lukewarm towards it and hoping things pick up in the latter half.

The Stranger Inside
by Laura Benedict
This one is pretty similar in basic concept to Our House, by Louise Candlish. The protagonist comes home to find that a complete stranger has moved into her house while she was out of town, and has all the paperwork to prove that he has supposedly rented the house from her for the next six months. This one is feeling like a three star rating thus far. The mystery and suspense are there, but the writing style falls kind of flat for me for the most part.

I recently finished reading…

Lilac Girls
by Martha Hall Kelly
(Full review here.)
This was a five star read for me, and was super refreshing after reading The Atomic City Girls, which turned out to be much…. fluffier than I’d hoped. Lilac Girls is a historical fiction novel which takes place during WWII and follows the stories of three women in very different circumstances: a young Polish girl who becomes a prisoner in a concentration camp, a doctor working for the German government, and an American socialite who is passionate about raising money to help the innocent people harmed by the war. Their stories all become intertwined by the end of the novel. I was particularly impressed by Kelly’s handling of the characters who were…. less than admirable, to say the least.

I thought she struck a very difficult balance in that the villains of the story felt fleshed out and nuanced without ever veering into the territory of seeming to justify their actions. I think there’s something very real about a story that depicts the horrors that can come from people who are not outwardly sadistic, but simply cowardly and willing to engage in mental gymnastics to justify their complicity in oppression. These stories feel important to me because they call attention to the fact that one doesn’t have to be consumed by hatred in order to enable harmful systems. They challenge us to examine our own behavior and ask when we may have turned a blind eye to harmful systems.

Up next…

The Au Pair 
by Emma Rous

(This is a duplicate from last week’s post because I’ve been super lazy about reading during the holidays and have yet to start this.)

A grand estate, terrible secrets, and a young woman who bears witness to it all. If V. C. Andrews and Kate Morton had a literary love child, Emma Rous’ The Au Pair would be it.

Seraphine Mayes and her twin brother Danny were born in the middle of summer at their family’s estate on the Norfolk coast. Within hours of their birth, their mother threw herself from the cliffs, the au pair fled, and the village thrilled with whispers of dark cloaks, changelings, and the aloof couple who drew a young nanny into their inner circle.

Now an adult, Seraphine mourns the recent death of her father. While going through his belongings, she uncovers a family photograph that raises dangerous questions. It was taken on the day the twins were born, and in the photo, their mother, surrounded by her husband and her young son, is beautifully dressed, smiling serenely, and holding just one baby.

Who is the child and what really happened that day?

One person knows the truth, if only Seraphine can find her.

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 12/19/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

current

The Stranger Inside by Laura Benedict
This is a NetGalley ARC for a February release. I haven’t formed an opinion yet, as I’m just getting into it, but it’s a mystery/thriller about a woman who comes home to find a mysterious stranger has moved into her house while she was out of town. (So, it’s similar to Our House, by Louise Candlish, but I’m hoping I’ll like this one more.)

Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly
This is a WWII historical fiction novel that I’m reading with my book club girls. The story follows three women in very different circumstances during the war, and I’m finding it a really difficult read, which is not to say it’s bad, but definitely raw and real.

I recently finished reading…

Warcross, by Marie Lu (full review here)
This sci-fi YA novel had a fun concept, and I wanted to love it, but it was just okay. It definitely doesn’t feel like one of those YA novels that translates well to an adult audience (like Strange the Dreamer, which I will stand by until I’m 80.) I do like what it set up for the sequel, Wildcard, though, so I will be reading the next book. (Side note: I have a signed copy of Wildcard, and as someone who isn’t crazy about the series, I’d rather it end up in the hands of a fan. I may host a giveaway over on my Tumblr or Instagram for both books sometime soon. I’ll update here if/when that happens.)

The Lost Manby Jane Harper (ARC – Release date February 5, 2019)
I just finished this yesterday, and I thought it was phenomenal. It started out slow and I wasn’t sure I was going to like it at all, but if you pick up a copy, do yourself a favor and stick it out through the first third or so. This is a mystery/suspense novel with some family drama aspects to it, with complex, morally gray characters and an interesting exploration of toxic masculinity and violence.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugoby Taylor Jenkins Reid (full review here)
This was a reread for my because my book club read it this month, and you all know by now that I love this book to pieces. If you haven’t read it, you’re missing out. I’ve never discussed it with anyone who didn’t absolutely love it, and most of the ladies in my book club said it was their favorite book we’ve read all year.

Killing Adam, by Earik Beann (ARC – Release date January 1st, 2019)
I thought I’d love this one, as it had a really interesting take on a kind of Ready Player One scenario. Most of the population is increasingly abandoning real life to spend their time in virtual reality, but in this novel, the protagonist is unable to engage with the software due to a brain anomaly, so he’s left behind and isolated in a lot of ways. Unfortunately, I found the writing kind of underwhelming, and this one ended up being just okay.

Up next…

The Au Pair 
by Emma Rous

A grand estate, terrible secrets, and a young woman who bears witness to it all. If V. C. Andrews and Kate Morton had a literary love child, Emma Rous’ The Au Pair would be it.

Seraphine Mayes and her twin brother Danny were born in the middle of summer at their family’s estate on the Norfolk coast. Within hours of their birth, their mother threw herself from the cliffs, the au pair fled, and the village thrilled with whispers of dark cloaks, changelings, and the aloof couple who drew a young nanny into their inner circle.

Now an adult, Seraphine mourns the recent death of her father. While going through his belongings, she uncovers a family photograph that raises dangerous questions. It was taken on the day the twins were born, and in the photo, their mother, surrounded by her husband and her young son, is beautifully dressed, smiling serenely, and holding just one baby.

Who is the child and what really happened that day?

One person knows the truth, if only Seraphine can find her.

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 12/12/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

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Killing Adam
by Earik Beann
This is an ARC of a January 1st release. It’s a dystopian science fiction novel where virtually all of humanity has “Altered Reality Chips” implanted into their brains and spend almost all of their time in virtual reality. The protagonist is one of the few people whose brains are, for varying reasons, incompatible with these chips.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo
by Taylor Jenkins Reid
This is a reread for me. I read this book months ago, but I’m reading it again because it’s this month’s selection for my book club, and also because it’s amazing. You can read my review here.

The Lost Man
by Jane Harper
This is an ARC of a February 5th release, and is Jane Harper’s third novel. I’ve read and loved her previous work, so I was really quick to request a copy of her latest mystery. As you can see, I haven’t made a ton of progress on this one yet. I’m not super into it so far, but if memory serves, her other books took me a bit to get invested as well, so I’m feeling optimistic about it still.

I recently finished reading…

The Female of the Species
by Mindy McGinnis
Read my full review here. This is a young adult novel which seeks to explore themes surrounding rape culture and violence. Alex, the protagonist, is a high school girl with tendencies towards violence, in part triggered with the rape and violent death of her sister. I definitely found this to be a worthwhile read, but I don’t think it accomplished everything it was trying to do in terms of a message.

Nine Perfect Strangers
by Liane Moriarty
This one has really mixed reviews on GoodReads, and I can totally understand why, but I thought it was really fun. It takes place at a health resort with… questionable methods. The pace for the whole first half of the book feels too slow, and Moriarty was definitely trying to do too much with too many characters, but once the story finally got going, it was weirdly hilarious and thrilling. It’s definitely one of the weirder books I’ve read lately despite being totally possible in the real world. Read my full review here.

The Atomic City Girls
by Janet Beard
This is a historical fiction novel which takes place during WWII, at a pop-up city where citizens were (in most cases unknowingly) working to develop the atomic bomb. The blurb led me to expect something a lot more serious, I think, and this read more like chick-lit. There’s nothing wrong with chick-lit, but writing a novel where the main character is helping to develop the world’s deadliest weapon and then having that take the back seat to a totally unnecessary unhealthy romance plot was… a confusing narrative choice to me. My full review will be up tomorrow.

Up next…

The Stranger Inside 
by Laura Benedict

This is another NetGalley ARC for a February 5th release.

Kimber Hannon’s belief that she has complete control over her life is shattered the night that she comes home from a trip to find her key no longer opens her front door. There is a stranger living in her house. A stranger who claims he has every right to be there, with the paperwork to prove it. When she confronts the man, he lets her get close enough to whisper, “I was there. I saw what you did.”

She doesn’t know how he knows her, but with those words Kimber knows this stranger isn’t after anything as simple as her money or artwork or charming Craftsman bungalow. She has to find out exactly what he wants and get him out of her carefully orchestrated life before he ruins it.

There are plenty of people in her life who might help, but should Kimber trust any of them? Her lawyer, Gabriel, is also her ex-lover; Diana, her best friend, doesn’t know Kimber slept with her husband; her ex-husband has a new, happier life since leaving her; and her co-workers know she’ll do anything to get her next sale. And no one can know the real reason this man is in her house. Without trust, everyone’s a stranger….
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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!