WWW Wednesday 03/13/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

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Beautiful Bad
by Annie Ward
This is a mystery/thriller and it’s been kind of slow going for me so far. I’m hoping it picks up in the second half, but right now I’m feeling a bit lukewarm towards it.

Daisy Jones & The Six
by Taylor Jenkins Reid
This is a reread for me; I’d read it a while back as an ARC, but the interview format of the book made me really want to check it out through audio book format. You can read my review of the book here.

Lost Roses
by Martha Hall Kelly
Nothing new to say here, as I’ve made zero progress on this one since last week. Oops. It’s not the book’s fault, I just got sucked into other reading, I’ve previously read Lilac Girls, from the same author, and it’s absolutely lovely.

I recently finished reading…

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Before She Knew Him, by Peter Swanson

(Review copy received at no cost courtesy of the publisher.) This was a fast paced and interesting thriller. You can read my full review here.
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The Goldfinch, by Donna Tartt

Tartt’s work can be really polarizing, and it’s easy to say why. The Goldfinch follows the story of a young boy named Theo in the aftermath of his mother’s sudden and violent death. I’m still gathering my thoughts in regards to how I’d rate this overall, as there were really captivating bits and then parts that seemed to needlessly drone on and on. (For reference, it’s 771 pages long.)

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Beasts of Extraordinary Circumstanceby Ruth Emmie Lang

I’m increasingly finding myself enjoying magical realism lately. This one has such a comfy, fairy tale vibe and I’m kind of kicking myself for leaving it unread on the shelf as long as I did. It follows the story of Weylyn Grey, orphaned as a young boy and raised by wolves. Weylyn has mysterious powers he can’t entirely control. Review to come!

Up next…
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Review copy of American Princess: A Novel of First Daughter Alice Roosevelt, by Stephanie Marie Thornton received courtesy of Berkley Books.

A sweeping novel from renowned author Stephanie Marie Thornton…

Alice may be the president’s daughter, but she’s nobody’s darling. As bold as her signature color Alice Blue, the gum-chewing, cigarette-smoking, poker-playing First Daughter discovers that the only way for a woman to stand out in Washington is to make waves–oceans of them. With the canny sophistication of the savviest politician on the Hill, Alice uses her celebrity to her advantage, testing the limits of her power and the seductive thrill of political entanglements.

But Washington, DC is rife with heartaches and betrayals, and when Alice falls hard for a smooth-talking congressman it will take everything this rebel has to emerge triumphant and claim her place as an American icon. As Alice soldiers through the devastation of two world wars and brazens out a cutting feud with her famous Roosevelt cousins, it’s no wonder everyone in the capital refers to her as the Other Washington Monument–and Alice intends to outlast them all.jennabookish

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

WWW Wednesday 03/06/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

readingThe Goldfinch
by Donna Tartt
I was nervous about starting this book because it’s rather long (almost 800 pages) and has a 3.90 average on Goodreads. (I’m increasingly finding that I’m not super likely to enjoy any book with an average rating of less than 4. Maybe I’m overly picky.) It’s still early, but so far, I’m enjoying it. The Goldfinch follows the story of a boy named Theo in the aftermath of his mother’s death in a terrorist attack.

Before She Knew Him
Peter Swanson
William Morrow books was kind enough to send me a free copy of this one, and I’m so excited to read it! I’m only one chapter into it right now, but the basic premise is that the protagonist, Hen, suspects her neighbor of being a murderer. It’s supposed to be a fun and twisty thriller.

Lost Roses
by Martha Hall Kelly
I received a NetGalley ARC of this April 9th release. Lost Roses is a historical fiction novel which takes place during WWI, and it is a prequel to Martha Hall Kelly’s last novel, Lilac Girls. It’s still too early for me to give much of an opinion on this book, but I do highly recommend Lilac Girls. 

I recently finished reading…

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As Long as We Both Shall Live
by Joann Chaney
Two words: big nope. I’m so glad I didn’t get this through a publisher because I would feel really bad about the review it’s going to be getting. This was probably a two star read for me. It’s a domestic thriller with a Gone Girl vibe, but not remotely of Gone Girl quality.

The Last Romantics
by Tara Conklin
This was my first novel by Tara Conklin, although I understand House Girl did very well. I read this for the Barnes and Noble book club, and I’m glad it was for a book club meeting, because I’m not sure I would have read it otherwise. The story didn’t grab me, but the more I read, the more I became enamored with Conklin’s writing style. The POV character is a poet and I feel like she really captured that very well.

The Turn of the Screw
by Henry James
This is a short novella and I don’t be reviewing it (I don’t particularly like reviewing classics as it seems a bit unfair given how much writing conventions change over time) but I didn’t particularly enjoy it. It’s meant to be horror and maybe I’m overly desensitized because I never got a creep factor at all and the story felt very dry to me.

The Huntress
by Kate Quinn
I went into this with really high expectations after reading The Alice Network, and I was not disappointed. The Huntress is a WWII historical fiction novel told from three separate perspectives. One character, Nina, gives her POV during the war, and the other two perspectives take place after. The main thrust of the novel is the hunt for an infamous Nazi known as “The Huntress” who disappeared into the shadows in the aftermath of the war, escaping justice.

Up next…

Beautiful Bad
By Annie Ward
(ARC received from Booktrib.)

In the most explosive and twisted psychological thriller since The Woman in the Window, a beautiful marriage turns beautifully bad.

Things that make me scared: When Charlie cries. Hospitals and lakes. When Ian drinks vodka in the basement. ISIS. When Ian gets angry… That something is really, really wrong with me.

Maddie and Ian’s romance began with a chance encounter at a party overseas; he was serving in the British army and she was a travel writer visiting her best friend, Jo. Now almost two decades later, married with a beautiful son, Charlie, they are living the perfect suburban life in Middle America. But when a camping accident leaves Maddie badly scarred, she begins attending writing therapy, where she gradually reveals her fears about Ian’s PTSD; her concerns for the safety of their young son, Charlie; and the couple’s tangled and tumultuous past with Jo.

From the Balkans to England, Iraq to Manhattan, and finally to an ordinary family home in Kansas, sixteen years of love and fear, adventure and suspicion culminate in The Day of the Killing, when a frantic 911 call summons the police to the scene of a shocking crime.

American Princess
by Stephanie Marie Thornton
(ARC receive from Berkley Books)

A sweeping novel from renowned author Stephanie Marie Thornton…

Alice may be the president’s daughter, but she’s nobody’s darling. As bold as her signature color Alice Blue, the gum-chewing, cigarette-smoking, poker-playing First Daughter discovers that the only way for a woman to stand out in Washington is to make waves–oceans of them. With the canny sophistication of the savviest politician on the Hill, Alice uses her celebrity to her advantage, testing the limits of her power and the seductive thrill of political entanglements.

But Washington, DC is rife with heartaches and betrayals, and when Alice falls hard for a smooth-talking congressman it will take everything this rebel has to emerge triumphant and claim her place as an American icon. As Alice soldiers through the devastation of two world wars and brazens out a cutting feud with her famous Roosevelt cousins, it’s no wonder everyone in the capital refers to her as the Other Washington Monument–and Alice intends to outlast them all.

jennabookish

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

WWW Wednesday 02/27/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

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The Huntress 
by Kate Quinn
I requested a copy of this from the publisher because I absolutely adored The Alice Network, and this one does not disappoint! The Huntress is a historical fiction novel set during WWII and told from 3 separate perspectives.

As Long as We Both Shall Live 
by JoAnn Chaney
I won’t lie, if I weren’t already a little behind on my GoodReads goal, I would have DNF’d this one by now, but I didn’t want the time already spent on it to be a waste. Skip ahead to the next section if you don’t want spoilers. I should learn my lesson and stop reading domestic thrillers because they generally don’t work well for me; they tend to be so over-the-top and filled with horrible people. This one is no exception, but my main problem with it is that it wants to be Gone Girl so bad that I’m almost afraid the author is going to kidnap Rosamund Pike and force her to star in a film adaptation.

I recently finished reading…

 American War
by Omar El Akkad

I read this with my book club and, overall, I feel it’s one of those books that I enjoy a lot more in concept than in execution. It takes place in a future version of America ravaged by climate change, disease, and a second civil war.
Unfortunately, I felt like the world building was really thin and would have liked a lot more of an exploration of how our world got from where it is today to the dystopia Akkad envisions in this book. It did, however, do a really good job of exploring radicalization and the forces which can turn an otherwise normal person into a terrorist. Read my review here.

Daughter of Moloka’i 
by Alan Brennert

(Full review to come.) This is the sequel to Moloka’i, and it didn’t live up to the first book for me. I will say that I seem to be in the minority opinion on this one, as most people on GoodReads are giving it very positive reviews. I’m still gathering my thoughts on it, but I’d probably rate it three stars. I got the impression that the author cared a lot more about the protagonist from the first book than he did about this one. This was supposed to be about Ruth, the daughter of Rachel, the first book’s main character, but it seemed like the author would take any excuse he could get to talk about Rachel rather than Ruth. Consequently, the book didn’t have the emotional depth that Moloka’i did for me.

Up next…

Lost Roses 
by Martha Hall Kelly

(NetGalley ARC, coming 04/09/2019)

The runaway bestseller Lilac Girls introduced the real-life heroine Caroline Ferriday. This sweeping new novel, set a generation earlier and also inspired by true events, features Caroline’s mother, Eliza, and follows three equally indomitable women from St. Petersburg to Paris under the shadow of World War I.

It is 1914 and the world has been on the brink of war so many times, many New Yorker’s treat the subject with only passing interest. Eliza Ferriday is thrilled to be traveling to St. Petersburg with Sofya Streshnayva, a cousin of the Romanov’s. The two met years ago one summer in Paris and became close confidantes. Now Eliza embarks on the trip of a lifetime, home with Sofya to see the splendors of Russia. But when Austria declares war on Serbia and Russia’s Imperial dynasty begins to fall, Eliza escapes back to America, while Sofya and her family flee to their country estate. In need of domestic help, they hire the local fortuneteller’s daughter, Varinka, unknowingly bringing intense danger into their household. On the other side of the Atlantic, Eliza is doing her part to help the White Russian families find safety as they escape the revolution. But when Sofya’s letters suddenly stop coming she fears the worst for her best friend.

From the turbulent streets of St. Petersburg to the avenues of Paris and the society of fallen Russian emigre’s who live there, the lives of Eliza, Sofya, and Varinka will intersect in profound ways, taking readers on a breathtaking ride through a momentous time in history.
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WWW Wednesday 02/20/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

readingAs Long as We Both Shall Live
by JoAnn Chaney

“What happens when you’re really, truly done making your marriage work? You can’t be married to someone without sometimes wanting to bash them over the head…
As Long As We Both Shall Live is JoAnn Chaney’s wicked, masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets…”

American War
by Omar El Akkad

This is the Girly Book Club selection for this month! It’s a post-apocalyptic science fiction novel that takes place in an America ravaged by climate change and a second civil war. I’m not far enough into it yet to have much of an opinion, but judging by reactions I’ve seen from others, almost no one seems to be lukewarm towards it. You’ll love it or hate it.

I recently finished reading…

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The Night Tiger
by Yangsze Choo
This is a historical fiction novel imbued with Chinese culture and folklore, a dash of magical realism, and a mystery to top it all off. I really enjoyed this one. Full review here.

The Lost Girls of Paris
by Pam Jenoff
Another historical fiction novel, this one takes place during WWII and is inspired by true events. The Lost Girls of Paris tells the stories of British female spies sent to sabotage Nazi efforts in France. Full review to come. This is a good choice for fans of The Alice Network and Lilac Girls. 

Moloka’i
by Alan Brennert
I just finished Moloka’i this morning. It’s (yet another) historical fiction novel. Moloka’i tells the story of a young Hawaiian girl named Rachel who contracts leprosy in the 1890’s and is sent to live on a leper colony away from her family. The novel follows her throughout her entire life. I sometimes tend to dislike stories which attempt to encapsulate the entire life of the protagonist, because it’s very easy for them to drag, but I thought this was beautifully done. Full review to com.e

Up next…

Daughter of Moloka’i 
by Alan Brennert

The publisher was kind enough to send me a copy of this book which was just released this week, so it’s next up on my TBR! This is what prompted me to read Moloka’i as it’s technically a sequel, but I get the impression from the blurb that it may be able to be read on its own.

“DAUGHTER OF MOLOKA′I is the highly anticipated sequel to Alan Brennert’s acclaimed book club favorite, and national bestseller, MOLOKA′I. It’s a companion tale that tells the story of Ruth, the daughter that Rachel Kalama—quarantined for most of her life at the isolated leprosy settlement of Kalaupapa—was forced to give up at birth.

The book follows young Ruth from her arrival at the Kapi’olani Home for Girls in Honolulu, to her adoption by a Japanese couple who raise her on a farm in California, her marriage and unjust internment at Manzanar Relocation Camp during World War II—and then, after the war, to the life-altering day when she receives a letter from a woman who says she is Ruth’s birth mother, Rachel.

DAUGHTER OF MOLOKA′I expands upon Ruth and Rachel’s 22-year relationship, only hinted at in MOLOKA′I. It’s a richly emotional tale of two women—different in some ways, similar in others—who never expected to meet, much less come to love, one another. And for Ruth it is a story of discovery, the unfolding of a past she knew nothing about. In prose that conjures up the beauty and history of both Hawaiian and Japanese cultures, it’s the powerful and poignant tale that readers of MOLOKA′I have been awaiting for fifteen years.”

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WWW Wednesday 02/13/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

readingAs Long as We Both Shall Live
by JoAnn Chaney
“What happens when you’re really, truly done making your marriage work? You can’t be married to someone without sometimes wanting to bash them over the head…
As Long As We Both Shall Live is JoAnn Chaney’s wicked, masterful examination of a marriage gone very wrong, a marriage with lots of secrets…”
I’ve only just started the audio book for this, so I have no thoughts so far, other than the fact that I think the narrator is a tad over the top.

The Night Tiger
by Yangsze Choo
I received a free copy of this as an official ambassador for the Booksparks winter reading challenge, and I’m absolutely loving it. Super magical and atmospheric.

Women Talking
by Miriam Toews
I’ve kind of stalled out on this one. This is a NetGalley ARC and it’s a novel based on a true story about a group of Mennonite women dealing with the aftermath of sexual violence in their community when they’ve been relatively isolated from the outside world and have limited means to leave. The premise really intrigued me and I feel like there’s an important story to be told, but the author’s stylistic choices just aren’t meshing well with my tastes. The narrator is a trusted male member of the community with limited writing skills, and the novel is told in the form of the minutes of a meeting between the women. The style is kind of killing it for me and I can’t get engaged.

I recently finished reading…

This Mortal Coil
by Emily Suvada
This is a YA science fiction novel that takes place in a post-apocalyptic world ravaged by a mysterious plague. I read this on the tail of Warcross and Wildcard, which I didn’t end up enjoying much, so maybe my perspective is skewed, but I thought this was a super fun and fast-paced read. I will be reading the sequel, This Cruel Design, soon.

The Promise
by Teresa Driscoll
I received a NetGalley ARC of this one. I requested it because I read one of Driscoll’s prior novels, I Am Watching You, with my book club last year, and I thought it was a pretty enjoyable read. This one was just okay for me. The central premise is about a group of women with a deep, dark secret going back to their boarding school days together. Their secret is in danger of being exposed because the boarding school is closing down and the land is scheduled for redevelopment. The story was interesting and had a fun, spooky vibe, but a bit too predictable.

The Outsider
by Stephen King
This book is kind of a wild ride in that it almost feels like two separate books. It all follows the same central story, but the first half reads like a murder mystery and the second half reads a bit like… well, It. Full review to come. I enjoyed it a lot, but I will say that you might not want to binge the audio book like I did, because there are a ton of characters to keep straight. My head was spinning a bit towards the end.

Up next…

The Lost Girls of Paris
by Pam Jenoff

From the author of the runaway bestseller The Orphan’s Talecomes a remarkable story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female spies during World War II.

1946, Manhattan

Grace Healey is rebuilding her life after losing her husband during the war. One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, she finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.

Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a ring of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.

Vividly rendered and inspired by true events, New York Times bestselling author Pam Jenoff shines a light on the incredible heroics of the brave women of the war, and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances
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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 02/06/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

reading

This Mortal Coil
by Emily Suvada
This is a young adult, science fiction, dystopian novel that’s largely about DNA and “gene hacking.” It’s been on my radar for a little while, and I finally picked up a copy when the sequel was released late last year. I’m a little less than halfway finished right now and I feel… cautiously optimistic about this book. The last YA sci-fi series I read was Warcross and this definitely seems like it’ll be a set above that.

The Promise
by Teresa Driscoll
This is a thriller which comes out tomorrow and I’m scrambling to get it finished so I can have a review up on the release date. I read I Am Watching You from the same author last year with my book club, and I liked it but didn’t love it. So far this is looking like a three star rating, but I’m hoping the later part of the book bumps it up to a four for me. It reminds me a lot of The Lying Game, by Ruth Ware (a group adult women returning to the boarding school where they grew up that harbors a dark secret from their past in danger of being exposed) but it’s definitely its own story.

Women Talking
by Miriam Toews
This is another ARC (April 2, 2019 release date) and I honestly can’t seem to get into it as much as I’d like. The feminist themes had me super intrigued when I read the blurb (it’s based on a true story and it’s about a group of Mennonite women who have been sexually victimized by the men in their community as they try to decide how to respond: do nothing, fight, or flee) but the writing feels rather… drab, honestly. It’s intentionally unpolished, as the narrator is meant to be a male member of the Mennonite community who they have asked for help because he can write, and he’s not highly educated, but I do think it takes away from the story. I wonder if this may have benefited from a third person omniscient narrator.

I recently finished reading…

I didn’t do a WWW Wednesday post last week, so I’ve finished a lot of books since the last one, so I won’t be discussing each title here as I normally would. I will say The Silent Patient was phenomenal. Full reviews should be coming soon on most of these titles (if you’re curious about a particular title, though, please feel free to ask about it in the comments and I’ll let you know some of my thoughts before I write my full review)!

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Up next…

This is the next book I’ll be reading as an official ambassador for the Booksparks Winter Reading Challenge! (By the way, the first two books were released yesterday: The Lost Man, by Jane Harper, and The Night Olivia Fell, by Christina McDonald. Both books are getting good reviews, but I highly recommend The Lost Man in particular!)

The Night Tiger
by Yangsze Choo

A sweeping historical novel about a dancehall girl and an orphan boy whose fates entangle over an old Chinese superstition about men who turn into tigers.

When 11-year-old Ren’s master dies, he makes one last request of his Chinese houseboy: that Ren find his severed finger, lost years ago in an accident, and reunite it with his body. Ren has 49 days, or else his master’s soul will roam the earth, unable to rest in peace.

Ji Lin always wanted to be a doctor, but as a girl in 1930s Malaysia, apprentice dressmaker is a more suitable occupation. Secretly, though, Ji Lin also moonlights as a dancehall girl to help pay off her beloved mother’s Mahjong debts. One night, Ji Lin’s dance partner leaves her with a gruesome souvenir: a severed finger. Convinced the finger is bad luck, Ji Lin enlists the help of her erstwhile stepbrother to return it to its rightful owner.

As the 49 days tick down, and a prowling tiger wreaks havoc on the town, Ji Lin and Ren’s lives intertwine in ways they could never have imagined. Propulsive and lushly written, The Night Tiger explores colonialism and independence, ancient superstition and modern ambition, sibling rivalry and first love. Braided through with Chinese folklore and a tantalizing mystery, this novel is a page-turner of the highest order.

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WWW Wednesday 01/23/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

current

The Silent Patient
by Alex Michaelides
This Thriller was my Book of the Month pick for January. There’s been so much buzz around this one, and I’m super intrigued so far!

Women Talking
by Miriam Toews
This is a NetGalley ARC (pub. date April 2, 2019) about a group of Mennonite women struggling to decide what to do in the aftermath of sexual violence in their community.

The Tattooist of Auschwitz
by Heather Morris

I’m definitely in the minority opinion on this book, but it’s really not working for me. The story itself is fine (although, being based on a true story, that really no credit to the author) but the writing style feels really mechanical and detached to me. Apparently the story was originally written as a screenplay, and I feel like knowing that has made some of my stylistic issues with it make more sense.

I recently finished reading…

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Queenie, by Candice Carty-Williams
This was a NetGalley ARC (pub. date March 19, 2019) about a 25-year-old Jamaican British woman named (you guessed it) Queenie. Queenie is in the midst of a downward spiral for most of this novel, coping with a miscarriage and loss of a long term relationship through lots of casual sex with people who couldn’t care less about her emotional well-being or even her sexual pleasure. Needless to say, this isn’t an effective coping mechanism for her. Full review won’t be up until the publication date, but I rated this one four stars.

Severance, by Ling Ma
Severance is a post-apocalyptic novel about Candace Chen, a Millennial living in New York who immigrated to the US from China as a child. This book has a really interesting mix of things going on, from the science fiction aspects (a mysterious fungal infection which has rendered most of the population zombie-like) to the exploration of culture and the experience of immigrants. A full review will be up tomorrow!

Unsheltered, by Barbara Kingsolver
I adore Barbara Kingsolver, and as much as I personally loved this novel, I do understand why it has very mixed reviews. This book is a mixture of contemporary and historical fiction, following the stories of two families living in the same place over a century apart. Kingsolver explores themes surrounding societal upheaval and family drama. At times, it can be a bit dialog-heavy and long-winded, and I think that was the bulk of the reason for some negative reviews. Personally, I was really invested in the characters, and these issues didn’t get to me. Full review here.

Up next…

Wildcard
by Marie Lu

I wasn’t super crazy about the first book of this series, but I was intrigued enough by the ending to want to continue. Both books have pretty solid averages on GoodReads, so I’m trying to be optimistic about starting this one.

Here’s the synopsis:

Emika Chen barely made it out of the Warcross Championships alive. Now that she knows the truth behind Hideo’s new NeuroLink algorithm, she can no longer trust the one person she’s always looked up to, who she once thought was on her side.

Determined to put a stop to Hideo’s grim plans, Emika and the Phoenix Riders band together, only to find a new threat lurking on the neon-lit streets of Tokyo. Someone’s put a bounty on Emika’s head, and her sole chance for survival lies with Zero and the Blackcoats, his ruthless crew. But Emika soon learns that Zero isn’t all that he seems–and his protection comes at a price.

Caught in a web of betrayal, with the future of free will at risk, just how far will Emika go to take down the man she loves?

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