WWW Wednesday 12/05/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

current

Killing Adam
by Earik Beann

This is an ARC of a January 1st release. As you can see I’ve just started it, so I haven’t really formed an opinion yet. This novel takes place in a futuristic society where virtually everyone has chips implanted which allow them to access virtual reality, which seems to increasingly take the place of actual reality. A small portion of the population, for varying reasons such as genetic anomalies or brain injuries, is unable to have these chips. The protagonist, Jimmy Mahoney, is one such person.

Nine Perfect Strangers
by Liane Moriarty

This is the newest release from the author of Big Little Lies. It has kind of mixed reviews, so I was a little unsure going into it, but I’m glad I picked it up. It took me a little longer than I would have liked to get into it, but I’m loving watching this ridiculous cast of characters in this ridiculous, somewhat unsettling scenario. It takes place at a health resort with rather… unconventional methods.

I recently finished reading…

Capture.PNG

The Gilded Wolves  (ARC – Pub. date: 01/15/2019) 
by Roshani Chokshi

A full review of this will be up closer to the publication date, but for now I’ll say it was really interesting. It’s a YA fantasy novel with an interesting magic system, secret societies, and a heist. And it looks to be the first installment of a new series, so I can’t wait to see where it’s going.

Dear Evan Hansen
by Val Emmich

Review to come. The short version is this: if you’re familiar with the musical, there won’t be a ton of surprises in store here, obviously, but the author has made some changes and additions. I liked this and went through it pretty quickly, but I’m not sure the novel was the best format for this story, and I think it works better as a musical.

The Night Olivia Fell (ARC – Pub. date: 02/05/2019)
by Christina McDonald

Again, I’m waiting until closer to the release date to put up my full review, but this one really fell flat for me. Full disclosure: I seem to be in the minority opinion in that regard, as it has a 4.47 Goodreads rating right now. I part of my issue with this is simply that it bore far too many similarities to Reconstructing Amelia. I honestly felt like I was reading the same novel all over again at times. If you haven’t read Reconstructing Amelia, you’ll probably get a lot more enjoyment out of this than I did.

Still Lives
by Maria Hummel

And another dud for me. Full review will be up tomorrow. This novel revolves around the disappearance of a famous artist on the night her new exhibition opens. The setup had a lot of potential to do some interesting things thematically and then the author just… didn’t. The pace was slow, the characters felt flat, and I found myself not even caring about solving the mystery.

Maybe in Another Life 
by Taylor Jenkins Reid

(Full review here.) This was my third Taylor Jenkins Reid novel (plus one short story) and I’ve liked all of her work that I’ve read so far. Maybe in Another Life is about the “what ifs” in life, and follows through two vary different story lines for the protagonist, each hinging on one seemingly minor decision. The paths widely diverge as Reid explores the domino effect and the concepts of fate and soulmates.

Up next…

The Lost Man
by Jane Harper

This is an ARC I received through NetGalley. Jane Harper is the author of The Dry and Force of Nature, both of which I really enjoyed, so I requested this one without even reading the blurb first.

“Two brothers meet at the border of their vast cattle properties under the unrelenting sun of outback Queensland, in this stunning new standalone novel from New York Times bestseller Jane Harper

They are at the stockman’s grave, a landmark so old, no one can remember who is buried there. But today, the scant shadow it casts was the last hope for their middle brother, Cameron. The Bright family’s quiet existence is thrown into grief and anguish. Something had been troubling Cameron. Did he lose hope and walk to his death? Because if he didn’t, the isolation of the outback leaves few suspects…

Dark, suspenseful, and deeply atmospheric, The Lost Man is the highly anticipated next book from the bestselling and award-winning Jane Harper, author of The Dry and Force of Nature.”

Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 11/28/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

current.PNG

The Night Olivia Fell
by Christina McDonald

This is a NetGalley ARC for a January release. It follows the story of a teenage girl named Olivia and her mother Abi, alternating viewpoints between them. Abi’s sections take place after the night of Olivia’s apparent accident which has left her brain dead, and Olivia’s sections are through flashbacks leading up to the accident. So far, this feels eerily similar to Reconstructing Amelia, but I’m withholding judgement until I see where it’s all going.

Maybe in Another Life
by Taylor Jenkins Reid

This one is a quick read with an interesting premise. It follows the protagonist, Hannah, through two wildly different story lines, hinging on whether or not she leaves a party with her ex boyfriend one night. I think we’ve all thought about how seemingly small choices can set us on a path that changes everything. What if leaving for work at one time vs. two minutes later is the difference between being in the right place or the wrong place  when a horrible accident takes place? What if you’re scheduling college classes and the best friend you haven’t met yet is in the 9:00 AM class while you’re considering taking it at 10:00? Maybe in Another Life is kind of a fun thought experiment that takes this premise and runs with it. Hannah’s life in either scenario bears little resemblance to the other. Both have challenges and joys that have nothing to do with the single decision that set her on that path; what was the “right” choice?

The Gilded Wolves 
by Roshani Chokshi

This is a super fun book and I really feel like I should have finished it by now. Oops. It’s a young adult fantasy novel with super interesting magic and world building, as well as lots of attention put into representation. It takes place in Paris in 1889 and has a fun heist story at the center of it. Basically, just read it. It’s good.

I recently finished reading…

The Air You Breathe
by Frances de Pontes Peebles
(Full review to come)

This was a book of the month pick over the summer that I finally made time to read, and I’m so glad I did. It’s a historical fiction novel which follows the story of Dores, a servant on a sugar plantation in Brazil in the 1930’s. She has a close but fraught friendship with Graca, the daughter of the plantation owner. The story opens when they are both young girls and follows them through adulthood as they bond over their shared love of music and dream of running away and becoming radio stars. If you liked The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, you may want to consider picking this one up.

A Spark of Light
by Jodi Picoult
(Full review here)

Jodi Picoult used to be a favorite author of mine, but I’ve enjoyed her work less and less as time goes on, in part because her books have started to feel excessively formulaic to me. A Spark of Light sounded intriguing based on the premise (a hostage situation at a women’s health clinic which provides abortions) but it felt like the story itself was overshadowed largely by rhetoric surrounding both sides of the abortion debate. I know Picoult often writes her novels as a means to explore a particular hot-button issue, but in this particular novel it left the story itself feeling overly thin.

46680914_298444814335039_1337786028127158272_n

The Only Woman in the Room
by Marie Benedict
(ARC – full review to come)

This is another historical fiction novel, but it’s based on an actual historical figure, Hedy Lamarr. It took me a little bit to get into this one, but once I did, I could not stop reading. Hedy Lamarr (born Hedy Kiesler) escaped Europe while Hitler was on the rise and traveled to Hollywood to become an actress. She meets with success there, but it haunted by a sense of survivor’s guilt over what’s happening with the war, and is driven to find a way to help with the war effort. I really enjoyed this novel, but I was a bit disheartened over where it ended. Hedy Lamarr died in 2000 at the age of 85, but The Only Woman in the Room ends during WWII. If you are interested to know more about her later life, I highly recommend checking out the documentary Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story. As of this writing, it’s available on Netflix.

Rage Becomes Her: The Power of Women’s Anger
by Soraya Chemaly
(Full review to come)

This is a collection of essays and it’s extremely clear while reading just how much research went into it. Chemaly cites study after study to back up her arguments, and also makes great efforts to be intersectional in  her feminism. Rage Becomes Her addresses not just the oppression of women, but how it intersects with other factors such as race and sexual orientation.

Up next…

Killing Adam
by Earik Beann

This book will be released in January and I recently received an ARC through NetGalley.

“The world runs on ARCs. Altered Reality Chips. Small implants behind the left ear that allow people to experience anything they could ever imagine. The network controls everything, from traffic, to food production, to law enforcement. Some proclaim it a Golden Age of humanity. Others have begun to see the cracks. Few realize that behind it all, living within every brain and able to control all aspects of society, there exists a being with an agenda all his own: the singularity called Adam, who believes he is God.

Jimmy Mahoney’s brain can’t accept an ARC. Not since his football injury from the days when the league was still offline. “ARC-incompatible” is what the doctors told him. Worse than being blind and deaf, he is a man struggling to cling to what’s left of a society that he is no longer a part of. His wife spends twenty-three hours a day online, only coming off when her chip forcibly disconnects her so she can eat. Others are worse. Many have died, unwilling or unable to log off to take care of even their most basic needs.

After being unwittingly recruited by a rogue singularity to play a role in a war that he doesn’t understand, Jimmy learns the truth about Adam and is thrown into a life-and-death struggle against the most powerful mathematical mind the world has ever known. But what can one man do against a being that exists everywhere and holds limitless power? How can one man, unable to even get online, find a way to save his wife, and the entire human race, from destruction?”

Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 11/21/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

current.PNG

The Only Woman in the Room
by Marie Benedict
I only just started this one; this is an ARC of a January release. It is a historical fiction novel about actress Hedy Lamarr and is set during WWII.

The Gilded Wolves
by Roshani Chokshi
This is another ARC for a January release. It’s a kind of mishmash of young adult, historical fiction, and fantasy. I’m really intrigued boy Chokshi’s attention to worldbuilding and magic systems, and this novel seems like a pretty good fit for fans of Brandon Sanderson and Laini Taylor.

A Spark of Light
by Jodi Picoult
Jodi Picoult used to be one of my favorite authors years ago, but I’ve read less and less of her work over time. I just feel like her books start to feel really formulaic if you read a lot of them. However, I was really intrigued by the concept behind A Spark of Light and I saw a signed copy in the store, so I thought I’d give this one a shot. The story revolves around a hostage situation in an abortion clinic.

I recently finished reading…

finished.PNG

This is a first for me; I’m posting a WWW Wednesday update and I don’t have reviews for any of the recently finished books up yet. The first three will all be up very soon; the last two are ARCs and reviews will be up close to the release dates.

My Plain Jane, by Cynthia Hand Jodi Meadows, and Brodi Ashton
This was a high priority on my TBR because I enjoyed My Lady Jane so much; it was so delightfully weird and imbued with humor. Sadly, this one really didn’t work for me. It felt more ridiculous than the last book, and the humor fell flat.

On a Cold Dark Sea, by Elizabeth Blackwell
This was my book club’s pick for the month; it’s a historical fiction novel which follows the story of three women who survive the Titanic sinking. This was a relatively short book and I think that was to its detriment. Blackwell tried to include full character arcs for three separate women spanning 20 years and she tried to do it in under 300 pages.

My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry, by Fredrik Backman
Backman is yet to disappoint me. This was such a cute, feel-good read. Elsa, a precocious 7-year-old, is the protagonist and her granny is her very best (and only) friend. When her granny passes away, she has to pass along a series of letters to people she knew in life, offering apologies varying from the humorous to the heart-wrenching.

Before We Were Strangers, by Brenda Novak
This is a mystery/thriller novel about a woman trying to solve the mystery of her mother’s disappearance over twenty years ago. I seem to be in the minority opinion on this one, as it has a Goodreads average of 4.23, but I was really unimpressed. It lacked any surprise and the character motivations often seemed really flimsy.

The Girls at 17 Swann Street, by Yara Zgheib
CW for anorexia. This novel follows the story of a woman entering an inpatient treatment facility for anorexia. While there wasn’t anything earth-shatteringly original, The Girls at 17 Swann Street seemed really heartfelt and I enjoyed reading it.

Up next…

This is a recent Netgalley approval and is set to be released in January.

The Night Olivia Fell
by Christina McDonald

“In the vein of Big Little Lies and Reconstructing Amelia comes an emotionally charged domestic suspense novel about a mother unraveling the truth behind how her daughter became brain dead. And pregnant.

A search for the truth. A lifetime of lies.

In the small hours of the morning, Abi Knight is startled awake by the phone call no mother ever wants to get: her teenage daughter Olivia has fallen off a bridge. Not only is Olivia brain dead, she’s pregnant and must remain on life support to keep her baby alive. And then Abi sees the angry bruises circling Olivia’s wrists.

When the police unexpectedly rule Olivia’s fall an accident, Abi decides to find out what really happened that night. Heartbroken and grieving, she unravels the threads of her daughter’s life. Was Olivia’s fall an accident? Or something far more sinister?

Christina McDonald weaves a suspenseful and heartwrenching tale of hidden relationships, devastating lies, and the power of a mother’s love. With flashbacks of Olivia’s own resolve to uncover family secrets, this taut and emotional novel asks: how well do you know your children? And how well do they know you?”
Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 11/14/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions: What are you currently reading? What did you recently finish reading? What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

reading The Girls at 17 Swann Street, by Yara Zgheib This novel opens with the protagonist, Anna, entering a treatment facility for anorexia. As you can see, I’m not very far into it yet, but it’s already a bit of an intense read.

My Grandmother Asked Me to Tell You She’s Sorry, by Fredrik Backman I was first introduced to Fredrik Backman through A Man Called Ove, which I absolutely loved. I then realized that my book club had read this book before I joined, and I had to see what I missed. This novel follows the story of seven year old Elsa following the death of her grandmother, who happened to be her very best (and only) friend. It also features the titular character of Britt-Marie Was Here and takes place before that novel. This is super sweet and funny so far, and it’s Fredrik Backman, so I know it’s going to make me cry.

Before We Were Strangers, by Brenda Novak I received an ARC of this courtesy of The Girly Book Club and Booktrib. This is a mystery/thriller novel coming December 4th which follows the story of a young woman Sloane McBride as she tries to investigate the disappearance of her mother… twenty years after the fact.

I recently finished reading…

finished When the Lights Go Out, by Mary Kubica (review) I was not a fan of this mystery/thriller; your mileage may vary. It has plenty of five star reviews absolutely raving about it, but it’s also currently holding a 3.26 average on Goodreads, so I definitely wasn’t the only one who wasn’t impressed. If you liked Mary Kubica’s other books, you’ll probably enjoy this one as well, but it almost certainly won’t be your favorite. The storytelling itself was mostly okay (with occasional instances of bafflingly clunky prose) but the conclusion absolutely killed it for me.

Daisy Jones and The Sixby Taylor Jenkins Reid (review to come) This is an ARC and the book release is scheduled for March 2019. A review will be scheduled for around that time. Daisy Jones and The Six is the story of a fictional rock band from the 1970’s, told in documentary style. I enjoyed this a lot, but I think I may have enjoyed it more had it not been for the format. Seriously, the whole book is told as if it’s an interview, and it got stale for me after a while. I was invested enough in the story itself that I’d still probably rate this four stars, but I think it would have been an easy five stars for me had the interview portions been broken up with a more traditional narrative format rather than… the whole book.

Her Pretty Faceby Robyn Harding (review to come) I’m struggling to come up with a rating for this one; I liked the reading experience well enough because I found the characters interesting, but it’s meant to be a mystery and I saw most of the major plot points coming a mile away. Harding makes attempts at misdirection, but they are so heavy-handed that the deception is obvious. You can’t spend chapters at a time telling me someone is a killer early in the novel without it becoming apparent that I need to look elsewhere or else the book would be a lot shorter.

Our House, by Louise Candlish This one (another mystery/thriller novel, by the way; I didn’t plan to be reading this many at once but library holds come in when they want to and not when I’m in the mood for a certain type of book) had a fun concept. Fiona Lawson comes home from a business trip to find that the house she has been sharing with her ex husband has apparently been sold. And the ex husband is nowhere to be found. It transitions between Fiona and her ex, Bram, and the mystery slowly unfolds. I do mean slowly. Our House had a really fun concept but it definitely suffered from some pacing issues.

Up next…

46131265_512751709241959_4005187922713116672_n The Only Woman in the Room, by Marie Benedict This is another ARC I received from The Girly Book Club and Booktrib. This historical fiction novel should be a nice change of pace for me after the mystery/thriller overload this past week. Here’s the book blurb:
She was beautiful. She was a genius. Could the world handle both? A powerful, illuminating novel about Hedy Lamarr.  Hedy Kiesler is lucky. Her beauty leads to a starring role in a controversial film and marriage to a powerful Austrian arms dealer, allowing her to evade Nazi persecution despite her Jewish heritage. But Hedy is also intelligent. At lavish Vienna dinner parties, she overhears the Third Reich’s plans. One night in 1937, desperate to escape her controlling husband and the rise of the Nazis, she disguises herself and flees her husband’s castle. She lands in Hollywood, where she becomes Hedy Lamarr, screen star. But Hedy is keeping a secret even more shocking than her Jewish heritage: she is a scientist. She has an idea that might help the country and that might ease her guilt for escaping alone — if anyone will listen to her. A powerful novel based on the incredible true story of the glamour icon and scientist whose groundbreaking invention revolutionized modern communication, The Only Woman in the Room is a masterpiece.
Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me… Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 11/07/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

current.PNGBefore We Were Strangers, by Brenda Novak
As you can see, I’ve barely dipped into this one, so I have no thoughts so far, but it’s a mystery/thriller novel. It follows the story of a young woman named Sloane McBride as she tries to solve the mystery of her mother’s disappearance years ago.

Daisy Jones and The Six, by Taylor Jenkins Reid
Bless NetGalley, this is all I’ve been wanting since I heard about the book shortly after finishing The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo. This is an ARC for a March 2019 release; it’s about a fictional rock band from the 1970’s and it’s written up sort of like a “mockumentary.”

When the Lights Go Out, by Mary Kubica
I’ve felt very lukewarm towards the other Kubica novels I’ve read, but I was curious about this one after seeing it over and over and over on Instagram, so here we are. I’ve been listening to the audiobook and once again feeling like Kubica isn’t really the author for me. This is a mystery novel which follows the story of Jessie Sloane after the death of her mother. When she applies for financial aid for college, an administrator tells her that her SSN is showing up as belonging to a dead girl. With no father in the picture and her mother taking any answers with her to the grave, Jessie needs to find out if her whole life has been a lie.

I recently finished reading…

Capture.PNG

Oooookay, clearly I’ve been busy.

This Will only Hurt a Little, by Busy Philipps
I don’t read a lot of memoirs and in general I find them hard to review when I do. How do I give a star rating to someone telling me about their personal life? That being said, I may or may not attempt to write up a full review for this one. While I don’t think Philipps is a monumentally gifted writer, I did enjoy this one; it’s written in a very conversational tone and just feels like she’s casually dishing gossip to the reader for the most part (although it does get a bit heavy more than once – CW for sexual assault.)

House of Gold, by Natasha Solomons (reviewed here)
I feel like I liked this one in concept more than I did in execution. It’s a historical fiction novel about a young heiress during World War I as she enters into an arranged marriage with a distant cousin. There’s a lot of social commentary and the family faces a lot of issues despite their wealth, as they are a Jewish family living in a time of rising antisemitism. However, the novel felt a bit rambling, skipped over big chunks of time, and had a few too many side-plots which I felt didn’t add much of value to the story.

The Bell Jar, by Sylvia Plath (reviewed here)
This was very emotionally difficult to read, but I’m glad I finally made the time for this one. Esther Greenwood’s descent into debilitating depression and madness was so well written, perhaps in large part due to the fact that Plath based much of it on her own experiences. Plath’s background as a poet was also evident in the writing.

Sadie, by Courtney Summers
I still need to write up a full review for this one. I don’t read a ton of YA, but I grabbed this one due to the huge amount of hype around it, and it was definitely worthwhile. Sadie follows the story of a young woman who disappears after the death of her younger sister. It’s fast-paced and heartbreaking.

Dear Mrs. Bird, by A.J. Pearce
I still need to review this one as well. This was a much-needed feelgood read for me, given some of the other content I’ve been reading lately. Dear Mrs. Bird is a historical fiction novel which takes place in England during WWII. The protagonist, Emmy, inadvertently takes a job at a women’s magazine where she will be sorting through the letters written into the help column. When it becomes clear that Mrs. Bird, who responds to these letters for the magazine, won’t answer anyone with any actually difficult problems, Emmy takes it upon herself to respond, risking her job and reputation in the process.

Up next…

The Girls at 17 Swann Street, by Yara Zgheib

(I know I said this last week… and maybe the week before. But I’m really trying to catch up on my ARCs and this is the last thing I have sitting out there in NetGalley right now.)

Blurb:

The chocolate went first, then the cheese, the fries, the ice cream. The bread was more difficult, but if she could just lose a little more weight, perhaps she would make the soloists’ list. Perhaps if she were lighter, danced better, tried harder, she would be good enough. Perhaps if she just ran for one more mile, lost just one more pound.

Anna Roux was a professional dancer who followed the man of her dreams from Paris to Missouri. There, alone with her biggest fears – imperfection, failure, loneliness – she spirals down anorexia and depression till she weighs a mere eighty-eight pounds. Forced to seek treatment, she is admitted as a patient at 17 Swann Street, a peach pink house where pale, fragile women with life-threatening eating disorders live. Women like Emm, the veteran; quiet Valerie; Julia, always hungry. Together, they must fight their diseases and face six meals a day.

Yara Zgheib’s poetic and poignant debut novel is a haunting, intimate journey of a young woman’s struggle to reclaim her life. Every bite causes anxiety. Every flavor induces guilt. And every step Anna takes toward recovery will require strength, endurance, and the support of the girls at 17 Swann Street.

Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

WWW Wednesday 10/31/2018

Happy Halloween, book nerds! Are you dressing up tonight?
Let me know your all-time favorite Halloween costume in the comments! Reading any spooky books to set the mood? Let’s chat!

45087811_474689789607182_3005026387506495488_n

It’s time for another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

Capture

I’m super behind on House of Goldby Natasha Solomons. I got approved for this ARC just shortly before it came out on October 23, and now I’m struggling to finish it and get a review up in a reasonable time frame. This is a historical fiction novel that takes place during WWI.

Dear Mrs. Birdby A.J. Pearce is another historical fiction novel. This one set during WWII. As you can see, I’m not exactly far enough into it to have formed an opinion yet.

I recently finished reading…

read.PNG

The Silence of the Girls, by Pat Barker (full review here)
This is a retelling of The Iliad told from the perspective of Briseis, who is taken as the unwilling concubine of Achilles after her city falls to his army. This one seems to have kind of mixed reviews (current GoodReads average is 3.9) but I really enjoyed it.

My Lady Jane, by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows (full review here)
An “alternate history” of England, My Lady Jane casts actual historical figures as shape-shifters. It’s 100% ridiculous, but a lot of fun.

The Broken Girls, by Simone St. James (full review here)
This is part contemporary, part historical fiction, part mystery… and a spooky ghost story. I definitely recommend checking this one out. It was the perfect read to set the mood for Halloween!

Up next…

Before We Were Strangers, by Brenda Novak

I received an ARC of this through my book club.

“Something happened to her mother that night. Something no one wants to talk about. But she’s determined to uncover her family’s dark secrets, even if they bury her.

Five-year-old Sloane McBride couldn’t sleep that night. Her parents were arguing again, their harsh words heating the cool autumn air. And then there was that other sound–the ominous thump before all went quiet.

In the morning, her mother was gone. The official story was that she left. Her loving, devoted mother! That hadn’t sat any better at the time than it did when Sloane moved out at eighteen, anxious to leave her small Texas hometown in search of anywhere else. But not even a fresh start working as a model in New York could keep the nightmares at bay. Or her fears that the domineering father she grew up with wasn’t just difficult–he was deadly.

Now another traumatic loss forces Sloane to realize she owes it to her mother to find out the truth, even if it means returning to a small town full of secrets and lies, a jilted ex-boyfriend and a father and brother who’d rather see her silenced. But as Sloane starts digging into the past, the question isn’t whether she can uncover what really happened that night…it’s what will remain of her family if she does?”

Thank you for reading! I didn’t realize until I was typing this up just how much my reading has skewed towards historical fiction lately. Hopefully Before We Were Strangers proves to be a nice change of pace to mix things up! Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

WWW Wednesday 10/24/2018

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

img_1384-0

I’m currently reading…

current.PNG

House of Gold, by Natasha Solomons
This one was released yesterday and I’m a little ashamed of myself that I didn’t get to in in time to post a release-day review. Oops. I received this as an ARC from NetGalley and then got distracted with library books and beta reading. But I’m finally getting into it and enjoying it so far. This is a historical fiction novel which takes place during World War I.

The Broken Girls, by Simone St. James
I can’t even tell you how many mystery/thriller novels have totally disappointed me lately, so I was hesitant to pick this up, but I’m so glad I did. The story takes place partly in the modern day following the story of a journalist, Fiona, whose sister was murdered when she was young; her body was found on the grounds of an old abandoned boarding school for young girls, Idlewild Hall. The other half of the story is told in flashbacks to the 1950’s when the boarding school was open. There are so many varied and interesting female characters and a ridiculously intriguing mystery. I can’t wait to review this one!

I recently finished reading…

Capture.PNG

The Sisters Hemingway, by Annie England Noblin
This was an ARC I received through the blogging I do for The Girly Book Club, and it was super enjoyable.  I will have a full review up closer to the release date this coming February, but for now I’ll say this might be a great selection if you like character-driven novels with a bit of mystery.

Lies, by T.M. Logan
You can read my review of this mystery/thriller novel here. This was super fast-paced and tense, with a Gone Girl kind of vibe and a great twist.

Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, by Balli Kaur Jaswal
This was October’s Girly Book Club selection, and such a pleasant surprise; it’s not something I would have chosen for myself and I ended up really loving it. Read my review here.

You can also watch the Girly Book Club’s author talk with Balli Kaur Jaswal on Youtube!

Girl, Wash Your Face, by Rachel Hollis
I don’t think I’ll be reviewing this one because it feels a bit unfair. I read it after a friend was raving about it, but I was just 100% not the right audience for it. Big chunks of it had to do with the author’s experience as a mother; I wish I’d known how prominent the topic of parenting would be before I picked it up, or I wouldn’t have bothered. No kids here. Can’t relate.

Up next…

I’m not 100% sure this will actually be next; I have a few ARCs laying around teh house and I need to dig through them to prioritize, but this is the last thing left on my NetGalley at the moment.

The Girls at 17 Swann Street, by Yara Zgeib

The chocolate went first, then the cheese, the fries, the ice cream. The bread was more difficult, but if she could just lose a little more weight, perhaps she would make the soloists’ list. Perhaps if she were lighter, danced better, tried harder, she would be good enough. Perhaps if she just ran for one more mile, lost just one more pound.

Anna Roux was a professional dancer who followed the man of her dreams from Paris to Missouri. There, alone with her biggest fears – imperfection, failure, loneliness – she spirals down anorexia and depression till she weighs a mere eighty-eight pounds. Forced to seek treatment, she is admitted as a patient at 17 Swann Street, a peach pink house where pale, fragile women with life-threatening eating disorders live. Women like Emm, the veteran; quiet Valerie; Julia, always hungry. Together, they must fight their diseases and face six meals a day.

Yara Zgheib’s poetic and poignant debut novel is a haunting, intimate journey of a young woman’s struggle to reclaim her life. Every bite causes anxiety. Every flavor induces guilt. And every step Anna takes toward recovery will require strength, endurance, and the support of the girls at 17 Swann Street.

Capture2.PNG

Other places to follow me…
Tumblr | Facebook | Instagram | GoodReads

What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!