WWW Wednesday 04/24/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

CaptureMiddlegame
by Seanan McGuire
(Free copy provided by publisher.)

This is a fantasy novel and my first book by Seanan McGuire, and I’m already a fan. Middlegame is deliciously weird and fascinating.

Becoming
by Michelle Obama

The library wait list for this book was ridiculous, but I’m finally reading it and it’s worth the wait.

The Plot to Cool the Planet
by Sam Bleicher
(Free copy provided by publisher.)

I’m not far into this, so I’m not sure what to think about it yet. It reads a bit like a dystopian novel. Global warming has reached a crisis point and drastic measures need to be taken to preserve life on earth.

I recently finished reading…

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Chase Darkness With Me
by Billy Jensen
(Free copy provided by Audible.)

Review to come! Billy Jensen is a true crime writer and helped finish Michelle McNamara’s book (I’ll be Gone in the Dark) after her sudden passing. Chase Darkness With Me is about his investigative work on other unsolved crimes.

The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls
by Anissa Gray

I don’t think I’ll be reviewing this one. It’s essentially about the aftershocks in a family when a couple is suddenly arrested and their children go to live with other family members. I liked the concept, but felt a bit lukewarm towards the actual execution.

The Farm
by Joanne Ramos
(Free copy provided by publisher.)

The Farm is about a facility serving up surrogate moms for hire to the super rich. The novel explores the idea of bodily autonomy and blurry lines of consent, privilege, etc. Read my review here.

Up next…

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Where the Crawdads Sing
by Delia Owens

A novel about a young woman determined to make her way in the wilds of North Carolina, and the two men that will break her isolation open.

For years, rumors of the “Marsh Girl” have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. She’s barefoot and wild; unfit for polite society. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark.

But Kya is not what they say. Abandoned at age ten, she has survived on her own in the marsh that she calls home. A born naturalist with just one day of school, she takes life lessons from the land, learning from the false signals of fireflies the real way of this world. But while she could have lived in solitude forever, the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. Drawn to two young men from town, who are each intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new and startling world–until the unthinkable happens.

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

The Farm, by Joanne Ramos (Review)


The Farm
by Joanne Ramos

Genre: Fiction

Length: 336 Pages

Release date: May 7, 2019

Publisher: Random House

Synopsis: 

Nestled in the Hudson Valley is a sumptuous retreat boasting every amenity: organic meals, private fitness trainers, daily massages–and all of it for free. In fact, you get paid big money–more than you’ve ever dreamed of–to spend a few seasons in this luxurious locale. The catch? For nine months, you belong to the Farm. You cannot leave the grounds; your every move is monitored. Your former life will seem a world away as you dedicate yourself to the all-consuming task of producing the perfect baby for your überwealthy clients.

Jane, an immigrant from the Philippines and a struggling single mother, is thrilled to make it through the highly competitive Host selection process at the Farm. But now pregnant, fragile, consumed with worry for her own young daughter’s well-being, Jane grows desperate to reconnect with her life outside. Yet she cannot leave the Farm or she will lose the life-changing fee she’ll receive on delivery–or worse.

Heartbreaking, suspenseful, provocative, The Farm pushes our thinking on motherhood, money, and merit to the extremes, and raises crucial questions about the trade-offs women will make to fortify their futures and the futures of those they love.

ratingthree

My thanks to Random House & NetGalley for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher. 

The synopsis for The Farm may have you expecting a dystopian novel of sorts, but the reality of the book is a lot closer to the real world than that. The Farm is less about government control run amok (à la Handmaid’s Tale) than it is about blurry lines of consent surrounding bodily autonomy.

No one forces the women in this book to go to the Farm to carry someone else’s baby, and they are paid quite handsomely for their troubles. But Ramos clearly wants the reader to ask which women had meaningful alternatives on the table and which did not. Entering a contract with Golden Oaks involves handing over all of one’s own agency for the duration of the pregnancy. The women may be pampered at the Farm,  but they sign an NDA, are unable to leave the premises, their internet activity is monitored, and they must apply for the privilege of visits from family members. The women who enter these contracts are overwhelmingly non-white immigrants with few other prospects.

The novel switches perspectives between multiple women connected to the farm: Mae, the power hungry and wealthy woman running the operation, Jane, a young single mother and immigrant desperate for the paycheck, Reagan, an upper middle class white woman who signed up primarily to relinquish her financial dependence on her family, and Ate, Jane’s older cousin who helped her get her “job” at the Farm. The differing perspectives really highlight the points Ramos wanted to raise in regards to privilege, but the sheer number of perspectives presented their own challenge. While Jane was definitely the most developed, none of these women ever felt really fleshed out, making it difficult to connect to the story.

The premise behind this novel is interesting and unique, and Ramos raises a lot of questions about agency and privilege. There was loads of promise in this book and there are moments that really shine, but the overall experience was just okay for me. No spoilers, but the resolution felt really lacking; the story skips forward several years for the epilogue, and the changes that have occurred in the interim feel unearned. All in all, this provides a lot of food for thought, but I wanted to love this book more than I did.

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The Editor, by Steven Rowley (Review)


The Editor
by Steven Rowley

Genre: Fiction, Historical Fiction

Length: 320 Pages

Release date: April 2, 2019

Publisher: Putnam

Synopsis: 

From the bestselling author of Lily and the Octopus comes a novel about a struggling writer who gets his big break, with a little help from the most famous woman in America.

After years of trying to make it as a writer in 1990s New York City, James Smale finally sells his novel to an editor at a major publishing house: none other than Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Jackie–or Mrs. Onassis, as she’s known in the office–has fallen in love with James’s candidly autobiographical novel, one that exposes his own dysfunctional family. But when the book’s forthcoming publication threatens to unravel already fragile relationships, both within his family and with his partner, James finds that he can’t bring himself to finish the manuscript.

Jackie and James develop an unexpected friendship, and she pushes him to write an authentic ending, encouraging him to head home to confront the truth about his relationship with his mother. Then a long-held family secret is revealed, and he realizes his editor may have had a larger plan that goes beyond the page…

From the bestselling author of Lily and the Octopus comes a funny, poignant, and highly original novel about an author whose relationship with his very famous book editor will change him forever–both as a writer and a son.

ratingfour

The Editor is Steven Rowley’s second novel, the first being Lily and the Octopus. Lily was a cute and sweet book, but a bit… odd, and I do have to say that The Editor feels like a big step up for Rowley as an author.

Imagine entering into a working relationship with an unknown person only to encounter an absolute cultural icon like Jackie Kennedy. The Editor is in part about the slow shift that occurs between viewing someone like that as a concept and coming to know them as a human being. The protagonist, James Smale, is initially starstruck by Jackie, but throughout the course of working on his semi-biographical novel with her, necessarily bears his soul, and a sense of mutual affection grows between the two. It had me thinking of the slow shift between Monique and Evelyn in The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo, so if that appealed to you as a reader, you’ll definitely find something to love in this book.

The novel James is working through with Jackie is inspired by events of his childhood. To work out all the kinks in the story, he needs to reframe his thinking and work through some unresolved personal issues, primarily involving his mother. The Editor, despite the potentially show-stealing presence of Jackie Kennedy, is at its heart a family drama. Unresolved conflicts and a little nudging from Jackie eventually lead James back to his childhood home to confront his demons…. or his family, as it were.

Rowley writes with such a sense of sincerity balanced with lighthearted humor. Jackie challenges James to address the truth behind his fiction and the result is emotionally raw and eventually heartwarming. The Editor is a story about the emotional vulnerability that is necessary for healing and the underlying humanity of those who seem larger than life. Rowley has definitely improved since his first novel, and The Editor is an absolute gem. I can’t wait to see what he writes next!

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Question of the day: If you were working on a novel and could have the help of any historical figure, who would you choose? Let me know in the comments!

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WWW Wednesday 04/17/2019

Welcome to another WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by Taking on a World of Words. To participate, just answer the following three questions:
What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

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I’m currently reading…

41398025What’s this? I’m only reading one book? This may be a first for one of my reading updates. Haha.

The Farm*
by Joanne Ramos
(*Free copy provided by publisher.)

“Nestled in the Hudson Valley is a sumptuous retreat boasting every amenity: organic meals, private fitness trainers, daily massages–and all of it for free. In fact, you get paid big money–more than you’ve ever dreamed of–to spend a few seasons in this luxurious locale. The catch? For nine months, you belong to the Farm. You cannot leave the grounds; your every move is monitored. Your former life will seem a world away as you dedicate yourself to the all-consuming task of producing the perfect baby for your überwealthy clients.

Jane, an immigrant from the Philippines and a struggling single mother, is thrilled to make it through the highly competitive Host selection process at the Farm. But now pregnant, fragile, consumed with worry for her own young daughter’s well-being, Jane grows desperate to reconnect with her life outside. Yet she cannot leave the Farm or she will lose the life-changing fee she’ll receive on delivery–or worse.

Heartbreaking, suspenseful, provocative, The Farm pushes our thinking on motherhood, money, and merit to the extremes, and raises crucial questions about the trade-offs women will make to fortify their futures and the futures of those they love.”

This one has kind of mixed reviews, and I think a big part of it is awkward marketing more than an indication of quality. Judging by reactions on GoodReads, it seems like a lot of people were expecting this to feel more like a dystopian novel or a full-on thriller (I kind of had the dystopian impression myself before reading), and it’s very much not that. The whole premise actually feels really ordinary in a kind of disturbing way. Don’t go into this expecting something that feels identical to The Handmaid’s Tale and I think most readers will like it.

I recently finished reading…

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I just finished The Editor moments before writing this up, so I’m still gathering my thoughts on it, but I thoroughly enjoyed it! Steven Rowley is the author of Lily and the Octopus, and I honestly had really mixed feelings about that one. The Editor feels like a big step up. Review to come soon!

Parkland: Birth of a Movement, by Dave Cullen. As I’ve mentioned before, I’m picky about what kinds of nonfiction I’ll review, and Parkland feels very much out of my comfort zone in that regard, so I won’t be posting a full review. That being said, I do highly recommend this book! I read Cullen’s Columbine book recently, and while it was clearly very well researched, the heavy focus on the perpetrators was off-putting. Parkland does not even name the shooter, and places the focus very much on the victims and their activism in the aftermath.

The Last Mrs. Parrishby Liv Constantine. This is another one I don’t feel like I can review. Too much of the plot was spoiled for me when I read comparisons between this and another book, so I went into it knowing exactly what to expect. Not a great reading experience for a mystery/thriller kind of book. Go into this one blind or not at all!

I posted my review of The Invitedby Jennifer McMahon yesterday. TLDR version: this is a fun ghost story, but unfortunately not my favorite by McMahon. This was a 3 star read for me. (*Free copy provided by publisher.)

And finally, The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters*, by Balli Kaur Jaswal. You can read my review here! This was a five star book for me. Balli Kaur Jaswal is quickly becoming a favorite author for me, and I adore the way she’s able to balance serious topics with a sense of humor and lightheartedness. (*Free copy provided by publisher.)

Up next…

Image may contain: text and waterThe Plot to Cool the Planet*
by Sam Bleicher

(repeat from last week because my time management is garbage right now)

(*Free copy provided by publisher.)

“Global warming lies at the center of this gripping speculative fiction involving a murder mystery, a daring secret plot, dangerous international conflict, and controversy over governance of geoengineering.
Available Earth Day, April 22, 2019 on Amazon and at your local bookstore.”

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What are you reading this week? Any thoughts on the books listed in this post?  Please feel free to discuss or share WWW links in the comments!

 

The Invited, by Jennifer McMahon (Review)

invited
The Invited
by Jennifer McMahon

Genre: Horror, Mystery

Length: 384 Pages

Release date: April 30, 2019

Publisher: Doubleday

Synopsis: 

A chilling ghost story with a twist: the New York Timesbestselling author of The Winter People returns to the woods of Vermont to tell the story of a husband and wife who don’t simply move into a haunted house, they start building one from scratch, without knowing it, until it’s too late . . . 

In a quest for a simpler life, Helen and Nate abandon the comforts of suburbia and their teaching jobs to take up residence on forty-four acres of rural land where they will begin the ultimate, aspirational do-it-yourself project: building the house of their dreams. When they discover that this charming property has a dark and violent past, Helen, a former history teacher, becomes consumed by the legend of Hattie Breckenridge, a woman who lived and died there a century ago. As Helen starts carefully sourcing decorative building materials for her home–wooden beams, mantles, historic bricks–she starts to unearth, and literally conjure, the tragic lives of Hattie’s descendants, three generations of “Breckenridge women,” each of whom died amidst suspicion, and who seem to still be seeking something precious and elusive in the present day.

ratingthree

My thanks to Doubleday Books and NetGalley for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher. 

The Invited is a super fun ghost story from Jennifer McMahon with an intriguing mystery to unravel. Helen and Nate abandon their jobs and the city life they know to build their own house in the woods of Vermont. The setup is a bit tropey and cliche; unwelcoming backwoods locals clash with outsiders from the city, rumors of a buried treasure, and a marriage strained by supernatural occurrences. Both Helen and Nate become caught up in their own respective obsessions related to the haunting of their new land.

I think the heavy use of familiar tropes made the ghost story feel cozy rather than overdone, and it made for a nice contrast to the creepier elements of the story. Helen’s background as a history teacher meshed well with her character’s growing obsession with the dark history of the land, and what starts out as a rather understandable fascination slowly begins to feel a bit sinister as the story goes on.

The novel is compulsively readable and I flew through most of it in a couple of days. That being said, there were a few reasons for my middle of the road rating, despite enjoying a lot of the aspects of the story. There were a few moments of clunky writing that read more like a debut author or a rough draft than what you’d expect from someone with multiple prior novels, like McMahon.

There’s a section of painfully unnatural dialog which was clearly only written the way it was because a character needed to overhear a key bit of information in order for the plot to progress. There are a few coincidences that strain the limits of credulity, and a plot twist connecting the modern story with the historical background of the land which can be seen from about a million miles away. This was a fun book, but it’s hard to call it anything more substantial than fun.

Jennifer McMahon’s The Invited may be a great choice for fans of Megan Miranda and Riley Sager.

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Thank you for reading! What was the last novel you read with a ghost involved in the plot? Let me know in the comments!

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The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters, by Balli Kaur Jaswal (Review)

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The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters
by Balli Kaur Jaswal

Genre: Contemporary Fiction, Cultural

Length: 320 Pages

Release date: April 30, 2019

Publisher: William Morrow

Synopsis: 

The author of the Reese Witherspoon Book Club selection Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows follows her acclaimed America debut with this life-affirming, witty family drama—an Indian This Is Where I Leave You—about three Punjabi sisters embarking on a pilgrimage to their homeland to lay their mother to rest.

The British-born Punjabi Shergill sisters—Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina—were never close and barely got along growing up, and now as adults, have grown even further apart. Rajni, a school principal is a stickler for order. Jezmeen, a thirty-year-old struggling actress, fears her big break may never come. Shirina, the peacemaking “good” sister married into wealth and enjoys a picture-perfect life.

On her deathbed, their mother voices one last wish: that her daughters will make a pilgrimage together to the Golden Temple in Amritsar to carry out her final rites. After a trip to India with her mother long ago, Rajni vowed never to return. But she’s always been a dutiful daughter, and cannot, even now, refuse her mother’s request. Jezmeen has just been publicly fired from her television job, so the trip to India is a welcome break to help her pick up the pieces of her broken career. Shirina’s in-laws are pushing her to make a pivotal decision about her married life; time away will help her decide whether to meekly obey, or to bravely stand up for herself for the first time.

Arriving in India, these sisters will make unexpected discoveries about themselves, their mother, and their lives—and learn the real story behind the trip Rajni took with their Mother long ago—a momentous journey that resulted in Mum never being able to return to India again.

The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters is a female take on the Indian travel narrative. “I was curious about how different the trip would be if it were undertaken by women, who are vulnerable to different dangers in a male-dominated society,” Balli Kaur Jaswal writes. “I also wanted to explore the tensions between tradition and modernity in immigrant communities, and particularly how those tensions play out among women like these sisters, who are the first generation to be raised outside of India.”

Powerful, emotionally evocative, and wonderfully atmospheric, The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters is a charming and thoughtful story that illuminates the bonds of family, sisterhood, and heritage that tether us despite our differences. Funny and heartbreaking, it is a reminder of the truly important things we must treasure in our lives.ratingfive

My thanks to William Morrow and Girly Book Club for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher. 

Balli Kaur Jaswal, author of past Reese Witherspoon Book Club and Girly Book Club pick Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, is back with a new novel, The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters! Sisters Rajni, Jezmeen, and Shirina are reeling from the recent death of their mother, but determined to fulfill her dying request: take a pilgrimage back to her homeland, India, visiting all the places she’d been to ill to go see one last time. Born and raised in England, the sisters gain a sense of appreciation for their heritage and for one another on their journey. 
 
Jaswal has a remarkable ability to imbue her novels with a lightheartedness and sense of humor while still grappling with serious issues. The three sisters in this novel must learn to overcome the emotional distance and secrets that have grown between them over the years. They also struggle with being treated as outsiders/tourists in India despite being there for deeply meaningful reasons for their Indian mother, as well as coming to grips with India as a relatively male-dominated society. The Unlikely Adventures of the Shergill Sisters reads like a feel-good book, but it quickly becomes clear that Jaswal has loaded the story with plenty of substance as well. 
 
If you loved Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows, you’ll fall head over heels for the Shergill sisters. Jaswal demonstrated her talent with her last novel, and it’s clear that she’s only grown as a writer since then! I’ve often cited Punjabi Widows as being a pleasant surprise for me; I read it for a book club meeting and never would have picked it out for myself, but ended up thoroughly enjoying it. I went into Shergill Sisters with high expectations and still ended up being pleasantly surprised all over again. I can’t wait to see what Balli Kaur Jaswal writes next! 

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Thank you for reading! Tell me about a novel you love with strong cultural themes in the comments! What did you love about it?

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Fight or Flight, by Samantha Young (Rant Review)

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Fight or Flight
by Samantha Young

Genre: Contemporary Romance

Length: 288 Pages

Release date: October 9, 2019

Synopsis: 

A series of chance encounters leads to a sizzling new romance from the New York Times bestselling author of the On Dublin Street series. 

The universe is conspiring against Ava Breevort. As if flying back to Phoenix to bury a childhood friend wasn’t hell enough, a cloud of volcanic ash traveling from overseas delayed her flight back home to Boston. Her last ditch attempt to salvage the trip was thwarted by an arrogant Scotsman, Caleb Scott, who steals a first class seat out from under her. Then over the course of their journey home, their antagonism somehow lands them in bed for the steamiest layover Ava’s ever had. And that’s all it was–until Caleb shows up on her doorstep.

When pure chance pulls Ava back into Caleb’s orbit, he proposes they enjoy their physical connection while he’s stranded in Boston. Ava agrees, knowing her heart’s in no danger since a) she barely likes Caleb and b) his existence in her life is temporary. Not long thereafter Ava realizes she’s made a terrible error because as it turns out Caleb Scott isn’t quite so unlikeable after all. When his stay in Boston becomes permanent, Ava must decide whether to fight her feelings for him or give into them. But even if she does decide to risk her heart on Caleb, there is no guarantee her stubborn Scot will want to risk his heart on her….

ratingone

Okay. Listen. I’m not much of a romance reader, so I went into this with low expectations, and I was still disappointed. And disgusted. And occasionally amused, but not in any of the moments that the author probably wanted me to be. I can have a really rough time with a book and I’ll still probably rate it two stars if it’s just bad; one star ratings are pretty much reserved for that magical combination of bad and also offensive. So let’s dissect this train wreck.

This book has one of my biggest personal pet peeves : altering spelling of common words to portray an accent. The author really, really wants you to remember that Caleb is Scottish at every single moment he’s on the page, changing every “to” to “tae” and sprinkling in a copious amount of “dinnaes”. I had a heads-up from my book club friends, so I rented the audio book to side-step that particular annoyance, thank god. Just tell us the character has an accent. We’ll believe you, Samantha Young. I promise.

But on to actual substance of the book, the two main characters are positively dripping in privilege, and not in a way that even comes across as escapist fantasy, they’re just gross. Ava has $4,000 a month rent because she must live in this expensive neighborhood and be within walking distance to work, she’s racked up credit card debt so that she can strut around in Louis Vuittons, and, of course, she can only ever fly first class. (She has a brief moment of clarity where she has a fleeting thought about her credit card debt and how some people have that kind of debt because they can’t afford healthcare; I know the author was trying to portray her as cognizant of her privilege, but really it just comes off gross, because her concern for others was so incredibly fleeting.)

Caleb, the male love interest, calls Ava “babe” constantly as soon as they meet, despite being told not do. He is also habitually rude to waiters and other service workers. Not cute. Enough said there. This is supposed to be a hate-to-love romance, I get it, so he needs to be a bit bristly at the beginning, but he is positively insufferable in a way that makes it too hard for him to be redeemed later in the story. Ava calls him a “dickhead” and then a “dickwad” on the day they meet (which he very much is, by the way), and he responds with some quip about how she must be obsessed with his dick because she keeps bringing it up. Did I mention these characters are not in junior high? Because you wouldn’t know it from that exchange.

By far my biggest issue with this book is this… What is consent? Nobody in this book knows, that’s for sure! Ava is definitely drunk the first time she sleeps with Caleb and only in retrospect talks about it as if she wasn’t. She has a bunch of drinks at the hotel bar to the point where she starts spilling about her personal traumas to this guy she admittedly hates. Then they go up to his room and have sex. But she wasn’t drunk. Definitely not drunk. It’s as if the author couldn’t figure out how to get the two of them in bed together without lowering their inhibitions with alcohol and then realized she didn’t like the optics of that so she pretended it didn’t happen that way.

There’s another “blurring of consent” moment involving the use of a condom (or lack thereof.) Admittedly, the sex scenes were cringe-inducing for me, and I started skipping chunks of them to get them over with, but I’m gathering from other reviewers that there’s a scene where Ava asks Caleb to put on a condom and he delays complying with that request, while continuing to have sex with her. Charming!

This part wasn’t awful but just kind of silly. Ava’s idea of ~really cutting loose~ is wearing skinny jeans. Mind you’ this is after having sex with a stranger, but somehow wearing jeans instead of something dressy is still some huge step outside of her “prim and proper” comfort zone.

“You weigh nothing.”
“I have an ass and boobs. I weigh something!”
Eyes rolling forever. I’m not even going to dissect that exchange, it was just annoying.

If there was anything I liked about this book, it was Ava’s relationship with her best friend, Harper. The two both have troubled backgrounds in totally different ways, and they love each other fiercely. Young gets some brownie points for portraying a positive and supportive female friendship without a trace of cattiness or competition. Unfortunately, it wasn’t enough to save this sinking ship of a novel for me.

Spoiler warning for this last bit.

I cannot handle the resolution of this novel. Ava and Caleb break off their non-relationship because Caleb is a commitment-phobe. Long story short, he realizes he’s made a mistake and wants to be with Ava again. By that point, she’s still a bit broken up about the way things ended, but she’s resolved to move on, get her life back together, and find someone who deserves her. Caleb can’t have that. He calls her boss, obtains Ava’s personal information from her, and ropes the boss into a secret plot to get Ava on a plane with him under the guise of sending her on a work assignment. What in the Christian Grey is this shit? Of course, being a romance novel, it turns out this was just the push Ava needed to see that she and Caleb truly belong together.

And they lived happily every after, I guess. Yikes. Stalking and gross violations of boundaries pay off, everyone! You heard it here first!

Image result for yikes gif

What was your last one star read and why? Tell me in the comments!

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